1 2013 Vol: 38(1). DOI: 10.5395/rde.2013.38.1.21

Comparison of the centering ability of Wave·One and Reciproc nickel-titanium instruments in simulated curved canals

The aim of this study was to evaluate the shaping ability of newly marketed single-file instruments, Wave·One (Dentsply-Maillefer) and Reciproc (VDW GmbH), in terms of maintaining the original root canal configuration and curvature, with or without a glide-path. According to the instruments used, the blocks were divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1, no glide-path / Wave·One; Group 2, no glide-path / Reciproc; Group 3, #15 K-file / Wave·One; Group 4, #15 K-file / Reciproc. Pre- and post-instrumented images were scanned and the canal deviation was assessed. The cyclic fatigue stress was loaded to examine the cross-sectional shape of the fractured surface. The broken fragments were evaluated under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for topographic features of the cross-section. Statistically analysis of the data was performed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The ability of instruments to remain centered in prepared canals at 1 and 2 mm levels was significantly lower in Group 1 (p < 0.05). The centering ratio at 3, 5, and 7 mm level were not significantly different. The Wave·One file should be used following establishment of a glide-path larger than #15.

Mentions
Figures
Figure 1: The picture indicates the points at which the canal width was measured after superimposition of pre- and post-operative images; (b) X1 represents the maximum extent of canal movement in one direction and X2 is the movement in the opposite direction. Y is the diameter of the final canal preparation. Figure 2: Centering ratio of canals at different apical levels. Values are mean ± SD. *A significant difference was determined at p < 0.05. NW, no glide-path / Wave·One; NR, no glide-path / Reciproc; KW, glidepath with K-file / Wave·One; KR, glidepath with K-file / Reciproc. Figure 3: Scanning electron micrographs of fracture surface of separated fragments. (a) Reciproc (×200); (b) Wave·One (×180).
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References
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