1 Acta Pharmacologica Sinica 2010 Vol: 31(4):461-469. DOI: 10.1038/aps.2010.12

Effects of chronic ethanol consumption on levels of adipokines in visceral adipose tissues and sera of rats

APS (Acta Pharmacologica Sinica), the top pharmacology research journal based in China, publishes original articles and reviews on all aspects of pharmacology and the related life sciences

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Figure 1: Effects of chronic ethanol treatments on leptin levels in VAT (A) and sera (B) of rats. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1for 22 weeks. VAT was obtained from epididymal and perirenal fat pads and blood samples were collected. Leptin levels in both VAT and sera were measured by ELISA. Values are given as mean±SD (n=12 in the 0 and 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1groups; n=11 in the 2.5 g·kg-1·d-1group; n = 10 in the 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1group).bP<0.05, cP<0.01 vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 group; fP<0.01 vs 5 g·kg-1·d-1 group. Figure 2: Effects of chronic ethanol treatment on adiponectin levels in VAT (A) and sera (B) of rats. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1for 22 weeks. VAT was obtained from epididymal and perirenal fat pads and blood samples were collected. Adiponectin levels in both VAT and sera were measured by ELISA. Values are given as mean±SD (n=12 in the 0 and 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1groups; n=11 in the 2.5 g·kg-1·d-1group; n=10 in the 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1group). bP<0.05, cP<0.01 vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 group; eP<0.05 vs 5 g·kg-1·d-1 group. Figure 3: Effects of chronic ethanol treatment on resistin levels in VAT (A) and sera (B) of rats. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1for 22 weeks. VAT was obtained from epididymal and perirenal fat pads and blood samples were collected. Resistin levels in both VAT and sera were measured by ELISA. Values are given as mean±SD (n=12 in the 0 and 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1groups; n=11 in the 2.5 g·kg-1·d-1group; n=10 in the 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1group). bP<0.05, cP<0.01 vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 group; eP<0.05 vs 5 g·kg-1·d-1 group. Figure 4: Effects of chronic ethanol treatment on visfatin levels in VAT (A) and sera (B) of rats. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1for 22 weeks. VAT was obtained from epididymal and perirenal fat pads and blood samples were collected. Visfatin levels in both VAT and sera were measured by ELISA. Values are given as mean±SD (n=12 in the 0 and 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1groups; n=11 in the 2.5 g·kg-1·d-1group; n=10 in the 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1group). cP<0.01 vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 group; fP<0.01 vs 5 g·kg-1·d-1 group; hP<0.05, iP<0.01 vs 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1 group. Figure 5: Effects of chronic ethanol treatment on cartonectin levels in VAT (A) and sera (B) of rats. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1 for 22 weeks. VAT was obtained from epididymal and perirenal fat pads and blood samples were collected. Cartonectin levels in both VAT and sera were measured by ELISA. Values are given as mean±SD (n=12 in the 0 and 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1 groups; n=11 in the 2.5 g·kg-1·d-1group; n=10 in the 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1 group). cP<0.01 vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 control group;eP<0.05 vs 5 g·kg-1·d-1 group. Figure 6: Effects of chronic ethanol treatment on serum TNF-α levels. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1for 22 weeks. Serum TNF-α levels were quantified by ELISA. Values are given as mean±SD (n=12 in the 0 and 0.5 g·kg-1·d-1 groups; n=11 in the 2.5 g·kg-1·d-1group; n=10 in the 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1group). cP<0.01 vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 group. Figure 7: Correlation between VAT and serum adipokine levels of rats. A correlation analysis was applied to test for significant correlations as follows: (A) correlations between VAT and serum leptin levels; (B) correlations between VAT and serum adiponectin levels; (C) correlations between VAT and serum resistin levels; (D) correlations between VAT and serum visfatin levels. Figure 8: Comparison of the increasing ratio of respective adipokine levels in both VAT and serum of rats. Wistar rats were fed with edible ethanol at 5.0 g·kg-1·d-1 for 22 weeks. VAT was obtained from epididymal and perirenal fat pads and blood samples were collected. Adipokine levels in both VAT and serum were measured by ELISA. The increasing ratio of adipokine levels (vs 0 g·kg-1·d-1 group) in both VAT and serum of rats is indicated in the bar graph.
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References
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